Strange But True...


I mentioned the Japanese release of Yoshi's Cookie in Yoshi's Biography, along with a screenshot of part of the cookie recipes.

Well, it took me a lot of work and fumbling with dictionaries and languages, but I have succeeded in translating them and have recieved positive feedback from people who tried them out.

I took two years of cookery in highschool and did various recipes at home, so I know most of what I'm talking about here, and that which I didn't, I looked up.

So, I post them here for your enjoyment. Let me know how they work - send an e-mail to any of my accounts with the subject line "Cookies" or similar.


  1. Heart Cookie Recipe
  2. Flower Cookie Recipe
  3. Battenbug Cookie Recipe
  4. Diamond Cookie Recipe
  5. Ring Cookie Recipe
  6. Yoshi Cookie Recipe
  7. Important Notes
  8. Pictures!

Heart Cookies
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In addition to the following ingredients, you'll need a baking sheet and some aluminium foil.

Take the butter from the fridge and allow it to reach room temperature.

Flatten the butter in a bowl as best you can, then whisk it until fluffy.

Add half of the sugar and beat it into the butter, then add the other half and beat until creamy.

Add the egg a little bit at a time, mixing well.

Add the dash of vanilla essence.

Sift the flour into a bowl, add the Baking Powder, then add it to the other ingredients.

Use a wooden spoon to mix everything together, and shape it into a dough.

Wrap the dough in clingfilm/plastic wrap, and put it in the refrigerator for 30 minutes.

Use a rolling pin to flatten the dough to about 5mm thickness.

Use a cookie cutter to cut out heart-shaped pieces, and put them on a sheet of aluminium foil on a baking tray.

[My notes: Use your thumb or a finger or the bottom of a spoon to make an indent in each cookie for the jam.

Bake in an oven at 180 Celsius until the cookies are uniformly golden brown.

Remove from the tray and place them on a wire rack to allow them to cool.

Put a little bit of jam in the indent of each cookie. For maximum freshness, put them into a cookie tin, with each layer of cookies separated by greaseproof paper.

To help you keep the dough uniformly flat, put two wooden rulers on either side of it, and roll the rolling pin over them. The dough will end up at the same thickness of the rulers.

Half an egg is kinda hard to do, so I suggest doubling everything and making a double batch of cookies.]

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Flower Cookies
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In addition to the following ingredients, you'll need a baking sheet and some aluminium foil. You'll also need a piping bag and an appropriate nozzle fitted to it.

Take the butter from the fridge and allow it to reach room temperature.

Flatten the butter in a bowl as best you can, then whisk it until fluffy.

Add half of the sugar and beat it into the butter, then add the other half and beat until creamy.

Add the two tablespoons of cream, and whisk it in.

Add the dash of vanilla essence.

Sift the flour into a bowl, then add it to the other ingredients.

Use a wooden spoon to mix everything together, and shape it into a dough.

Put the dough into a piping bag fitted with a nozzle that will pipe into flower shapes. Pipe them out onto a sheet of aluminium foil on a baking tray at roughly even intervals.

[My notes: Use your thumb or a finger or the bottom of a spoon to make an indent in each cookie for the jam. Measuring spoons are best here because they tend to be semi-spherical.

Bake in an oven at 180 Celsius until the cookies are uniformly golden brown.

Remove from the tray and place them on a wire rack to allow them to cool.

Put a little bit of jam in the indent of each cookie. For maximum freshness, put them into a cookie tin, with each layer of cookies separated by greaseproof paper.

Piping bags are quite hard to get hold of. You'll need to find somewhere special if you want to buy one... or chances are your grandmother has one.]

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Battenburg Cookies
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In addition to the following ingredients, you'll need a baking sheet and some aluminium foil.

Take the butter from the fridge and allow it to reach room temperature.

Flatten the butter in a bowl as best you can, then whisk it until fluffy. Don't use a whisk that's too large or the butter will go through the spaces and you'll have to fish it out with a knife.

Add half of the sugar and beat it into the butter, then add the other half and beat until creamy.

Add the egg a little bit at a time, mixing well.

Add the dash of vanilla essence.

Sift the flour into a bowl, add the baking powder, then add it to the other ingredients.

Use a wooden spoon to mix everything together, and shape it into a dough. If it refuses to form a dough, instead stying in small clumps, at 1/8th of a cup of water, and mix well. Repeat if necessary. If you add too much water the dough will become excessively sticky; in this case, just add more cake flour, and mix well. When the dough forms into a ball and comes away from the sides of the bowl, you've got it right.

Divide the dough in half. Take one half of the dough out of the bowl, and add the cocoa powder to the other half, mixing it in with a wooden spoon.

Shape each half into a cuboid (or as close as you can get) and wrap each half separately in plastic wrap. Put them in the freezer until frozen. Finding a long cuboidal box will help them keep their shape.

Cut each block in half lengthways (so you end up with two long rectangular prisms, and not two smaller cuboids). [Note: Since they're frozen, you'll need a very large and/or sharp knife to do this!]

Put each half on a half of the other type; chocolate on plain and vice-versa, so you end up with two blocks that are half-and-half.

Wrap them separately in plastic wrap and put them in the freezer until frozen.

Cut them in half lengthways again (so you end up with long rectangular prisms that are half plain and half chocolate).

Here's the clever bit: For each block, turn one half over, then stick them back together to get a checkerboard effect!

Again, wrap them separately in plastic wrap (you can probably re-use the same stuff) and put them in the freezer until frozen.

Take out both blocks and cut them sideways into cookies five millimetres thick. Put them on a tray with aluminium foil.

[My notes: Bake in an oven at 180 Celsius (350 farenheit) until the cookies are just starting to go brown around the edges. I have a regular, non-fan-assisted oven and it took 15 minutes.

Take note that the cookies will swell a little during baking, so don't put them too close together.

Remove from the tray and place them on a wire rack to allow them to cool.

Half an egg is kinda hard to do, so I suggest doubling everything and making a double batch of cookies.

Refer to the picture in the notes for how to make the checkerboard effect, if the description wasn't clear.]

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Diamond Cookies
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To make the Diamond Cookies, just follow the Heart Cookie recipe, and use a diamond-like cookie cutter, and different jam.

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Ring Cookies
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To make the Ring Cookies, make the dough using the Heart Cookie recipe, then tear off parts of the dough (don't roll it out) and shape them into rings as best you can. If you're lucky you might be able to find a plastic form in a play-dough set that makes rings.

You can sprinkle poppy seeds on them if you so wish. Alternately you can use wheat flour for a different texture.

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Yoshi Cookies
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Good luck. You're going to have to make your own cutter, or you can make a paper outline and cut around it as a template. You'll need to use a knife to score lines into the dough, or use the handle to press them in. Again, follow the Heart Recipe for the dough.

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Important Notes
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Vanilla Essence is very, very expensive. I paid $5.49 plus tax (Canadian) for a 43 milliliter bottle. So remember to only use a few drops in each recipe!

Here are pictures of the six cookies in case you're not sure which goes with which.

Converting grams to ounces:
20 Grams = 0.704 Ounces
50 Grams = 1.761 Ounces
60 Grams = 2.113 Ounces
80 Grams = 2.817 Ounces
130 Grams = 4.577 Ounces

Cooking is a very imprecise science so you won't need to get much more accurate than one decimal place.

Here's how you combine the battenburg cookies:

Make sure to wait for the Battenburg Cookies to freeze, or when you try to combine the blocks they'll just squish together into a mess.

Most of this stuff can be picked up at your nearest supermarket, with the exception of piping bags. Those are pretty special (and sometimes expensive). You can look at the supermarket if you want, but if all else fails, ask someone you know who's into cooking. Here's what a piping bag looks like:

I never did find where the baking powder was supposed to be added. Just add it to the flour before you start, or you can also use self-raising flour, which already has baking powder in it.

Here are some substitutes you can make:

These recipes, and the images used, are copyrighted to Nintendo. The translation is copyrighted to myself, as are the notes provided.

~Darkmark


Here are pictures I have taken of the cookies I made!


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